Slide background

News

Insomnia More Common in COVID-19 Survivors

by: Elise Chahine, Sleep Foundation

COVID-19 infection may have a large neurological and psychiatric impact on as many as one-third of its survivors.

A study published by Lancet Psychiatry finds that insomnia may be one of the most common neurological and psychiatric outcomes from COVID-19. Researchers evaluated the electronic health records of TriNetX, a global health research network, for approximately 236,000 patients, 10 years of age and older, who tested positive for COVID-19 from January 20, 2020 and were recorded as still alive on December 13, 2020 (see table for baseline characteristics). There was an estimated incidence of 14 neurological and psychiatric outcomes in the 6 months following a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, which included (but are not limited to) brain hemorrhage, stroke, muscle disease, dementia, mental health disorders, and insomnia. COVID-19 infection group’s outcomes were compared with flu and other respiratory tract infection groups’ outcomes.

Read more ...

Sleep Apnea: What it is, its risk factors, its health impacts, and how it can be treated

by: Eric Suni , Sleep Foundation

Sleep apnea is a condition marked by abnormal breathing during sleep. People with sleep apnea have multiple extended pauses in breath when they sleep. These temporary breathing lapses cause lower-quality sleep and affect the body’s supply of oxygen, leading to potentially serious health consequences.

Sleep apnea is one of the most common sleep disorders in the United States. It can affect children and adults and people of both sexes, although it is more common in men.

Because of sleep apnea’s prevalence and potential health impact, it is important for people to be aware of what sleep apnea is and to know its types, symptoms, causes, and treatments.

 

Read more ...

Researchers look for ways to conquer sleep apnea

By: Carla K. Johnson Associated Press

Every night without fail, Paul Blumstein straps on a mask that prevents him from repeatedly waking up, gasping for air.

It’s been his routine since he was diagnosed with a condition called sleep apnea. While it helps, he doesn’t like wearing the mask.

Read more ...

Why 'beauty sleep' is real, according to doctors

by: Nicole Spector, NBC News

A new survey found that well-rested people report having a brighter complexion, clearer skin and fewer wrinkles.

“Are you okay? You look tired.”

I can’t come close to counting how many times someone has said this to me, and no matter the empathetic tone in their voice, it’s never a compliment. Basically, they’re saying I look like crap — specifically my face. My eyes are puffy and red with dark half-moons below. My skin is blotchy and my coloring is wan.

Read more ...